Foreign Fathers, Japanese Mothers, and the Hague Abduction Convention: Spirited Away

Barbara Stark

Volume 41 - Issue 4, Summer 2016, Page 762

Abstract

While The Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of Child Abduction (the “Abduction Convention”)3 was drafted to facilitate this process, its application in cases involving Japanese nationals is problematic, especially in cases where the mother is Japanese. This Article explains why this is so, and why it is so hard to harmonize the family laws of different countries. It also describes the real risks that a child, or a parent, may be ‘spirited away,’ with no chance of actual contact, for far too long.

Cite as: Barbara Stark, Foreign Fathers, Japanese Mothers, and the Hague Abduction Convention: Spirited Away, 41 N.C. J. Int'l L. 762 (2016).
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