Max P. Biedermann

Max P. BiedermannClass of 2015
Note & Comment Editor, Volume 40
Staff Member, Volume 39

I grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor of sciences in International Business and a minor in Marketing from Pepperdine University in Malibu, California. While serving on the journal, I have written about the situation in Ukraine and international efforts to curb the use of anonymous corporate vehicles as tax shelters and money laundering mechanisms.

I am a Note and Comment Editor for the North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation, the executive vice president of the UNC Federalist Society, and a member of the Transactional and Corporate Law Association. I also currently work as an extern for the North Carolina Small Business Technology Development Center and have done pro bono work for an intellectual property law firm in the area. During the past two summers, I have worked as an intern for the Honorable Ann Marie Calabria at the North Carolina Court of Appeals and as an extern for Chief Judge Stephani W. Humrickhouse at the United States Bankruptcy Court Eastern District of North Carolina. 

Blog Posts

al-Shahaab Raid Justified by AUMF

On October 5, 2013, US Navy SEALS conducted a raid to capture Abdikadir Mohamed Abdikadir, a Kenyan national, in Somalia. Abdikadir is a senior member of al-Shabaab, the al-Qaeda linked terrorist group that claimed responsibility for the deadly attack on the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya. Considering that U.S. embassy operations are currently suspended in Somalia, and the United States is not engaged in a military conflict with Somalia outside of performing support obligations to the Africa Union through NATO, under what authority was the United States acting?


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No Comments | Posted by Max P. Biedermann on Wed. February 12, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: African Union, AUMF, Customary International Law, Kenya, Somalia, Syria

Free Trade Deal Reached Between Canada and European Union

After four years of negotiating, the European Union and Canada agreed to terms on a free trade deal on October 18, 2013. In 2012 the European Commission estimated that nearly 116 billion U.S. dollars of trade in goods and services was conducted between the two parties. As a result, the European Union is Canada’s second largest trading partner. Approval of the deal by the European Parliament and its member states is pending, as is federal and provincial approval in Canada.

Once the Canada-EU Trade Agreement (CETA) is approved, 99 percent of tariffs between the European Union and Canada will be removed. For example, “the 10 per cent EU tariff on passenger vehicles will be eliminated, as will tariffs on auto parts which run up to 4.5 per cent.” If retailers pass these savings on to consumers, this will mean that Canadians will pay substantially less for items including food, wines and spirits, and European cars. Canadian businesses will also benefit from this deal. For example, the Canadian agricultural industry will be able to export products such wheat, maple syrup, pork, and beef duty free to the European Union. With increased exports, Canadian businesses are expected to create more jobs. The government in Ontario, for example, estimates that CETA will lead to the creation of 30,000 jobs throughout the province.


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No Comments | Posted by Max P. Biedermann on Tue. November 5, 2013 8:00 AM
Categories: Canada, European Union, Free Trade
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